Sugar and the Glycemic Index

April 8th, 2013 by Dr. Keith Nemec

A diet favoring complex versus refined/processed carbohydrates is better for the heart and less likely to slow down metabolism than a conventional low-fat diet, a preliminary study confirms.

The “glycemic index’’ diet recommends carbohydrates that do not cause a sharp rise in blood sugar levels after meals, instead of highly processed, starchy, or refined carbohydrates. It is not as anti-carb as Atkins-style regimens, nor as fat-restrictive as standard low-fat diets.

The study involved 39 overweight people ages 18 to 40 who ate hospital-prepared diets for about 10 weeks. Low-glycemic foods were given to 22 participants, while 17 received the low-fat option.

Participants in both groups lost an average of about 20 pounds. But glycemic index dieters did better on two risk factors for heart disease: They had a decrease in triglycerides/fats in the blood, versus an increase in the low-fat group, and they had a much greater reduction in levels of an inflammation-related substance called C-reactive protein.

-Journal of the American Medical Association.

Dr Keith & Laurie Nemec Comments on “Glycemic Index Diet” Study

This study shows a powerful reality:  Sugar causes inflammation. Remember inflammation is at the root of most all diseases from heart disease to cancer to autoimmune diseases, to gastrointestinal disease to respiratory disease. The study also shows that the low glycemic diet actually lowered the triglycerides/fats in the blood more than eating a low fat diet.

This is because sugar turns into fat and does more to raise the fat because typical low fat diets have higher starches that turn into fats. The answer to diet is quite simple: eat food in the most natural state which is living/raw plant food.  The single most detrimental factor to causing sugar levels to rise in the blood is cooking the food.  Heat destroys enzymes which are important to break food down so it does not cause sugar levels to rise.  So the ideal low glycemic diet is one of sprouts, raw/uncooked vegetables, seeds, nuts, legumes, sprouted uncooked grains, sea vegetables and avocados.

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