Cold Temperatures May Help You Lose Weight

March 4th, 2014 by Dr. Keith Nemec

Regular exposure to cold temperature may be a healthy and sustainable way to help people lose weight. On the contrary, staying inside in our warm, comfortable homes and offices might be partly responsible for gaining weight.”Since most of us are exposed to indoor conditions 90 percent of the time, it is worth exploring health aspects of ambient temperatures,” said lead researcher of Maastricht University Medical Center in The Netherlands. “What would it mean if we let our bodies work again to control body temperature? We hypothesize that the thermal environment affects human health and more specifically that frequent mild cold exposure can significantly affect our energy expenditure over sustained time periods.”

Earlier studies of temperature primarily focused on the extreme for application to the military, firefighters, and others. But studies began to show big differences amongst people in their response to mild cold conditions. That led researchers to an important discovery: heat-generating, calorie-burning brown fat isn’t just for babies. Adults have it too and some more than others.

The research now suggests that a more variable indoor temperature — one that is allowed to drift along with temperatures outside — might be beneficial.

A research group from Japan found a decrease in body fat after people spent 2 hours per day at 17 degrees Celsius (62.6 degrees F) for six weeks. The Netherlands team also found that people get used to the cold temperature over time. After six hours a day in the cold temperature for a  period of 10 days, people in their study increased brown fat, felt more   comfortable and shivered less at 15 degree Celsius (59 degrees F).

In young and middle-aged people at least, non-shivering heat production can account for a few percent up to 30 percent of the body’s energy budget. That means lower temperatures can significantly affect the amount of energy a person expends overall.

So perhaps, in addition to our exercise training, we need to train ourselves to spend more time in the cold.

By lack of exposure to a varied ambient temperature, whole populations may be prone to develop diseases like obesity. In addition, people become vulnerable to sudden changes in ambient temperature.”

-Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism

Dr. Keith & Laurie Nemec’s Comments on Cold Temperature May Help You Lose Weight:

What this study shows it that our bodies were meant for stress. They strive under stress and stay much healthier under   stress.

What do you mean by stress? This could be the healthy stressing of muscle with a weight, or it could be fasting for a day by only drinking water, or it could be by getting out in the cold weather each day going for a walk. All this is stress hardening which allows the body to adapt to the stress by getting stronger in every way. By growing stronger muscles, a stronger immune system, a stronger circulation, and a stronger mental outlook.

What do you think our forefathers, the explorers and early settlers in this country had? Plenty of healthy stress, but they also had one thing that we are lacking today. They kept their eyes fixed on the goal and paid no attention to the stress and by doing so they overcame tremendous obstacles and were much healthier.

What you focus on you increase in your life. Focus on the life God designed you to have which ISN’T all soft and comfortable. For when you are weak (and stressed) that is when you are STRONG IN HIM.

These vital issues on how to keep your eyes on who you are not who you appear to be are covered in detail on our audio teaching: Sally & George- Going Deeper, Seven Basic Steps to Total Health and our How to Know You Are Healed series.

1.   Sally & George

2.   The Seven Basic Steps to Total Health

3.   How to Know You Are Healed

Don’t be a couch potato or a warm and comfortable potato. Get up, get out and start  brisk walking today for 30 minutes outside no matter what the temperature is. This will benefit you in so many ways.

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